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Property level flood resilience grant scheme Eden 2015

Property Level Flood Resilience Grant Scheme eligibility

This funding applies to properties flooded as a result of Storm Desmond and Storm Eva. The owners of the following premises have been deemed eligible for the scheme.

  • Residential properties (including accommodation such as static caravans where they are defined as the primary residence on the electoral roll) where habitable internal areas of the premise has been damaged by Storm Eva and Storm Desmond. For rented properties the landlord (or property owner) will needed to apply for the funding.

  • Owners of second homes where habitable internal areas of the premise has been damaged by Storm Eva and Storm Desmond are also eligible to apply.

  • Businesses (including social enterprise and holiday let accommodation) and charitable organisations properties where internal areas of premises which are critical to the day-to-day operations (for example: not storage sheds or warehouses) have been damaged by Storm Eva and Storm Desmond.

    The grants are intended only to fund measures which improve the property's resilience or resistance to flooding.

What does this mean if I am a property owner?

Owners of properties that have been flooded will wish to consider whether they might be eligible for a flood resilience grant. If they think they may be eligible, they should contact Customer Services to find out what steps they need to take next.

Grants are intended only to fund measures which improve the property's resilience or resistance to flooding, over and above repairs that would normally be covered by insurance. Where resilient repairs can be provided at the same cost as standard like-for-like repairs, insurers should act to encourage take-up as part of the standard reinstatement process.

There is more information at Annex B - possible measures for property owners who want to find out more about the kind of measures that might be suitable for their property.

What does this mean for local authorities?

Property owners whose properties have suffered flood damage as a result of Storm Desmond and Storm Eva are eligible to apply for a grant. See definition of flood at Annex A.

How will the grants be provided?

Across Cumbria a consistent scheme has been adopted. However, decisions in respect of each individual case on whether to provide a grant, and at what level, will be made by Eden.

Grants will be payable to the person responsible for the fabric of the property, normally the property owner.

Definition of a flooded property

This definition is from Defra's National Flood Emergency Framework:

Properties flooded are those where it is considered that the property has been flooded internally, for example:

  • Where water has entered the property;
  • Basements and below ground level floors are included;
  • Garages are included if in the fabric of the building. Garages adjacent or separate from the main building are not included;
  • Includes occupied caravans and park homes, but not tents

Which properties will benefit from flood resilience grant?

The funding is for the impacts of flooding from adverse weather conditions and not, for instance, from the failure of water main, internal water systems, or the failure of a sewerage system (unless the failure was itself caused by the adverse weather conditions). As a guide, the definition of a flood from Section 1 of the Flood and Water Management Act 2010 is at Annex A.

Homeowners can obtain a tailored report on the type of flood resilience measures that might be appropriate for the property from the Property-Protection-Adviser, which will give guidance on the kind of measures that might need to be fitted and their likely cost. You will be asked a few simple questions about your property and will receive a tailored report that takes into account the age and type of property. An indicative list of flood resilience measures is also provided at Annex B. For eligible properties, any measure recommended by the Property-Protection-Adviser report, or included in Annex B, will automatically qualify for Repair and Renewal Grant funding. Where appropriate, we recommend that homeowners use products that carry the BSI kitemark for flood protection products (PAS1188) or similar standards.

In order to reduce the risk of fraud, the homeowner will be asked to subsequently produce receipts or invoices confirming the work has been carried out.

Ideally, grant application forms should be submitted and approved in advance of committing expenditure. If applications are retrospective, there is a risk to the homeowner that costs may not be eligible.

How should the grant link with the insurance sector?

Local authorities will work closely with the insurance sector to ensure that there is a clear process to enable the delivery of the grant payments.

The scheme is a contribution towards making properties more resilient to future flooding, which will help ensure they get the best possible deal for flood insurance in future.

How much grant will be available?

Grants of up to £5,000 are available, depending on whether sufficient appropriate resilience measures can be put in place.

Grants will be payable to the person responsible for the fabric of the property, normally the property owner. Individuals should be made aware of the potential benefits of pooling their grants in order to carry out larger scale flood protection and resilience work where appropriate.

Where grants are to be combined, a survey will be required to support the application.

For flats, normally only one £5,000 will be available for each ground floor property.

What can the grant be spent on?

Grants are intended to fund additional measures over and above the costs of repairs that would normally be covered by insurance. Where resilient repairs can be provided at the same cost as standard like-for-like repairs, insurers should act to encourage take-up as part of the standard reinstatement process.

Grants are not intended to cover standard repairs or to provide compensation. They must be used only for improvements to the fabric of the premises that would have the impact of reducing the impact and cost of subsequent flooding on the property.

How to apply for a property level flood resilience grant

Complete the application for property level flood resilience grant (Word Document: 36Kb / 7 pages).

Annex A - Definition of Flood

Section 1 of the Flood and Water Management Act 2010

  1. Flood includes any case where land not normally covered by water becomes covered by water.

  2. It does not matter for the purpose of subsection (1) whether a flood is caused by -

    1. heavy rainfall,
    2. a river overflowing or its banks being breached,
    3. a dam overflowing or being breached,
    4. tidal waters,
    5. groundwater, or
    6. anything else (including any combination of factors).

  3. But "flood" does not include:

    1. a flood from any part of a sewerage system, unless wholly or partly caused by an increase in the volume of rainwater (including snow and other precipitation) entering or otherwise affecting the system, or

    2. a flood caused by a burst water main (within the meaning given by section 219 of the Water Industry Act 1991

Annex B - Possible Measures

The kinds of measures that could be considered are set out below. This is an indicative list; different measures will be appropriate for different properties at different stages in the repair process. The list includes both resistance measures (designed to keep the water out) and resilience measures (internal modifications intended to reduce the cost of any damage from flood water).

There is also a lot of useful advice on the Environment Agency web pages, but the best starting point for those who are new to understanding flood risk is the National Flood Forum website. The National Flood Forum website sets out a step-by-step process for property owners and links to a wide range of other sources of information, including the Blue Pages, which list a range of flood products and service providers.

The site includes a Property-Protection-Adviser, which will give a clear idea about the kind of measures that might need to be fitted and their likely cost. The Adviser asks users a few simple questions about the property and will produce a tailored report that takes into account the age and type of property. For eligible properties, any measures recommended by the Property Protection Adviser, or listed below, will automatically qualify for funding from the Repair and Renew Grant scheme. This list is not, however, intended to be exhaustive: it will also be open to local authorities to consider alternative proposals for individuals to use the grant for flood resilience measures, including the pooling of grant funding to use on street or community level flood protection where appropriate.

Indicative list of possible measures

Property level-measures Description of Measure / Type of Flood Risk? Indicative cost range £s
Professional Survey of Premises to Identify Flood Risks (can be undertaken prior to RRG application to identify most appropriate measures and up to £500 of costs applied for retrospectively). Professional survey undertaken to identify property flood risk, and identify appropriate resilience and / or resistance measures. Up to £500 including VAT
Flood Risk Report. Professional Flood Risk Report can be commissioned after resilience and / or resistance measures fitted to inform any future works, and/ or to submit to insurance companies to demonstrate action taken / level of future risk.  
Airbrick Cover. Watertight cover for airbricks. 20-40
Self-closing airbrick. Replacement airbrick that automatically closes to prevent flooding. 50-90
Sewerage Bung. Inflatable device to insert in U-bend of toilet to prevent sewage backflow. 30-50
Toilet Pan Seal. Seal to prevent sewage backflow. 60-80
Non-return valves 12mm overflow pipe Valve prevents backflow through overflow pipe. 70-110
Non-return valves 110mm soil waste pipe. Prevents backflow through soil waste pipe. 550-650
Non-return valves 40mm utility waste pipe. Valve prevents backflow through waste pipe. 80-120
Silicone gel around openings for cables. Prevents flooding through openings for cables to access properties. 80-120
Water resistant repair mortar. Water resistant mortar used to repair walls and improve future resistance. 80-120
Re-pointing external walls with water resistant mortar. Improve water resistance through using water resistant mortar to re-point walls. 150-250
Waterproof external walls. Membrane fitted to make external walls water resistant? 200-400
Replace sand-cement screeds on solid concrete slabs (with dense screed). Dense water resistant screed to replace sand cement screed. 670-740
Replace mineral insulation within walls with closed cell insulation. Replacement of wall insulation with water resistant insulation. 720-800
Replace gypsum plaster with water resistant material, such as lime. Replace existing plaster to water resistant material in property. 4,280-4,740
Sump Pump. A pump used to remove water that has accumulated in a water collecting sump basin. 400-600
Demountable Door Guards. Guard fitted to doors to resist flooding. 500-900
Automatic Door Guards. Door guards that automatically close to prevent flooding. 1,000-2,000
Permanent flood doors. Permanent door (rather than demountable) which is flood resistant.  
Demountable Window Guards. Guard fitted to window to resist flooding. 500-900
Septic tank resistance or resilience measures. Septic tank resistance or resilience measures such as isolation valves and venting above flood level.  
Resilience protection through external walls/ measures within overall boundary of property. Additional resilience measures within overall boundary of property.  
Replace ovens with raised, built-under type. Raising oven off floor above flood level. 700-780
Replace chipboard kitchen/bathroom units with plastic units. Fit plastic kitchen and/ or bathroom units to minimise water damage. 5,000-5,520
Move electrics well above likely flood level. Rewiring of electrics (such as socket points) above flood level. 760-840
Mount boilers on wall. Raise boiler above flood level. 1,080-1,200
Move service meters above likely flood level. Raise service meters above flood level. 1,620-1,800
Replace chipboard flooring with treated timber floorboards. Replace floor (including joists) to make water resistant. 920-1020
Replace floor including joists with treated timber to make it water resilient. Replace floor including joists with treated timber to make it water resilient. 3,490-3,850
Install chemical damp-proof course below joist level. Install damp proof course to resist groundwater flooding. 6,250-6,910
Replace timber floor with solid concrete. Replace wooden flooring with concrete. 8,210-9,070

Cumbria Community Foundation Resistance and Resilience Top-Up Grant

Cumbria Community Foundation has introduced a Resistance and Resilience Top-Up Grant which is available to individuals who have applied to Eden District Council for a Property Level Resilience Grant. The Top-Up Gran is for up to £2000 if applicants' costs exceed £5000. The Top-Up Grant can support groups of neighbours who wish to apply for a combined scheme.

For full details and an application form please go to www.cumbriafoundation.org or telephone 01900 825760.